aadatart:

Above: Adjani Okpu-Egbe, “Popping”, 2013. Adjani was born in Kumba, Cameroon in 1979
Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting
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African & Afro-Diasporan Art TalksJoin us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

aadatart:

Above: Adjani Okpu-Egbe, “Popping”, 2013. Adjani was born in Kumba, Cameroon in 1979

Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting

-

African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

"You cannot find peace by avoiding life."

Virginia Woolf (via kushandwizdom)

Simple weekend

Simple weekend

"Loneliness and the feeling of being unwanted is the most terrible poverty."

Mother Teresa (via wordsthat-speak)

(via wordsthat-speak)

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian Writer Sefi Atta Talks Life, Literature and Leaving Nigeria in Interview with Elle South Africa.
Nigerian writer Sefi Atta was recently in Cape Town for the annual Open Book Festival. Elle Magazine South Africa interviewed Atta who was both refreshingly honest and inspiring.
As a Nigerian whose experiences of moving around and living in multiple countries mirrors hers, I love what she had to say about the ways in which being a global citizen has informed her passion for writing, "I feel that Nigeria gave me my stories, America gave me the opportunity to tell them, and England gave me my love for literature."
A recipient of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa, Atta has written plays for film, radio and stage, as well as several short stories and three novels. Her most recent book, A Bit Of Difference, is the first to not be centered on life in Nigeria, something Atta believes is a natural and logical progression of the relationship between her personal life and writing.
"The fact that I started writing stories based in Nigeria was just logical to me. People asked why I was writing about Nigeria when I’d been living in England for so long, but the earliest stories need to be told first: it seemed an orderly way to do it. When I got to writing a bit of difference, I was ready to talk about England. My next books will be set in the US. I’m an organized thinker and this makes sense to me."
Atta, who studied in England and has lived in America for two decades, is also brutally honest about the realities of why she, and many other young Nigerians, end up seeking a new life abroad saying:
"The reason I left Nigeria was that I had a degree, but it was hard to be independent. No matter how much you earned as a graduate, you couldn’t live on your own, and culturally it was very different…I went back to England because I knew that I’d be able to be independent.”
Beyond the obvious and glaring issues that plague everyday life in Nigeria, Atta’s reasons for leaving then still echo strongly for many young Africans living on the continent. There’s a certain unique struggle that many who wish to emigrate face - both young and old, but the hunger for independence and need to experience more of what the world has to offer makes it all the more difficult.
Ending the interview, Atta ends with her definition of feminism, "Feminism today to me: for me it’s being allowed to be who you are, and it’s that simple."
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian Writer Sefi Atta Talks Life, Literature and Leaving Nigeria in Interview with Elle South Africa.

Nigerian writer Sefi Atta was recently in Cape Town for the annual Open Book Festival. Elle Magazine South Africa interviewed Atta who was both refreshingly honest and inspiring.

As a Nigerian whose experiences of moving around and living in multiple countries mirrors hers, I love what she had to say about the ways in which being a global citizen has informed her passion for writing, "I feel that Nigeria gave me my stories, America gave me the opportunity to tell them, and England gave me my love for literature."

A recipient of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa, Atta has written plays for film, radio and stage, as well as several short stories and three novels. Her most recent book, A Bit Of Difference, is the first to not be centered on life in Nigeria, something Atta believes is a natural and logical progression of the relationship between her personal life and writing.

"The fact that I started writing stories based in Nigeria was just logical to me. People asked why I was writing about Nigeria when I’d been living in England for so long, but the earliest stories need to be told first: it seemed an orderly way to do it. When I got to writing a bit of difference, I was ready to talk about England. My next books will be set in the US. I’m an organized thinker and this makes sense to me."

Atta, who studied in England and has lived in America for two decades, is also brutally honest about the realities of why she, and many other young Nigerians, end up seeking a new life abroad saying:

"The reason I left Nigeria was that I had a degree, but it was hard to be independent. No matter how much you earned as a graduate, you couldn’t live on your own, and culturally it was very different…I went back to England because I knew that I’d be able to be independent.”

Beyond the obvious and glaring issues that plague everyday life in Nigeria, Atta’s reasons for leaving then still echo strongly for many young Africans living on the continent. There’s a certain unique struggle that many who wish to emigrate face - both young and old, but the hunger for independence and need to experience more of what the world has to offer makes it all the more difficult.

Ending the interview, Atta ends with her definition of feminism, "Feminism today to me: for me it’s being allowed to be who you are, and it’s that simple."

Twitter | FacebookPinterest | Google+ Soundcloud | Mixcloud

All Africa, All the time.

(via accrawalkintours)

nigerianostalgia:

Fishermen and children in Calabar, 1981
Vintage Nigeria

(via immigrantslenz)

newyorker:

Teju Cole writes:

“Is Ebola the ISIS of biological agents? Is Ebola the Boko Haram of AIDS? Is Ebola the al-Shabaab of dengue fever? Some say Ebola is the Milosevic of West Nile virus. Others say Ebola is the Ku Klux Klan of paper cuts.”

Still from YouTube

newyorker:

Teju Cole writes:

“Is Ebola the ISIS of biological agents? Is Ebola the Boko Haram of AIDS? Is Ebola the al-Shabaab of dengue fever? Some say Ebola is the Milosevic of West Nile virus. Others say Ebola is the Ku Klux Klan of paper cuts.”

Still from YouTube

(Source: newyorker.com)

hersheyhipster:

humansofnewyork:

"If they raise the subway fare one more time, I’m going to explode. I’m making nine dollars an hour. I walk home three hours from work every day to save that $2.50, because that’s a half gallon of milk for me and my daughter. And every time they raise the fare, they have a ‘hearing.’ But they aren’t hearing anything. It’s a fucking joke. If you go to one of those ‘hearings,’ every single person stands up and says: ‘Don’t raise the fare.’ Then they raise it anyway. Oh man, it burns me up. ‘We need the money,’ they say, ‘America is hurting.’ That’s bullshit! If I see one more TV program bragging about multimillion dollar homes I’m gonna scream. How about a fucking TV program that shows me if there is anywhere in this city that I can fucking afford to live anymore. I’m sorry, but it’s burning me up."

Do not apologize sir.

hersheyhipster:

humansofnewyork:

"If they raise the subway fare one more time, I’m going to explode. I’m making nine dollars an hour. I walk home three hours from work every day to save that $2.50, because that’s a half gallon of milk for me and my daughter. And every time they raise the fare, they have a ‘hearing.’ But they aren’t hearing anything. It’s a fucking joke. If you go to one of those ‘hearings,’ every single person stands up and says: ‘Don’t raise the fare.’ Then they raise it anyway. Oh man, it burns me up. ‘We need the money,’ they say, ‘America is hurting.’ That’s bullshit! If I see one more TV program bragging about multimillion dollar homes I’m gonna scream. How about a fucking TV program that shows me if there is anywhere in this city that I can fucking afford to live anymore. I’m sorry, but it’s burning me up."

Do not apologize sir.

(via black-culture)


if you don’t know this reference, you’re too young for my blog tbh

if you don’t know this reference, you’re too young for my blog tbh

(Source: iloveyalike-xo, via dynastylnoire)

redefiningbodyimage:

Just another example of how beauty standards and body hate are (and always have been) fabricated.

redefiningbodyimage:

Just another example of how beauty standards and body hate are (and always have been) fabricated.

(via dynastylnoire)

cutfromadiffcloth:

Brand: Vlisco

Splendeur Collection

cutfromadiffcloth.tumblr.com

(via yagazieemezi)

(Source: kushandwizdom)

lastnightsreading:

Saeed Jones at Housing Works Bookstore, 10/7/14

lastnightsreading:

Saeed Jones at Housing Works Bookstore, 10/7/14

(via rachelfershleiser)

Jason Jones Fills In For Jon Stewart, Immediately Calls Joe Biden ‘The Seinfeld Of Vice Presidents’ | Uproxx

(Source: popculturebrain)